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Meningococcal


About the vaccine:

Vaccines help prevent the most common causes of meningococcal disease.



Types:

  • Meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY)
  • Serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (MenB)

Who should get the vaccine:

  • Pre-teens (11-12)
  • Teens and young adults (16-23)

High-risk populations:

Babies and children at increased risk (2 months – 10 years)
  • With complement component deficiency
  • Taking complement inhibitor
  • Damaged or removed spleen
  • Have HIV
  • Traveling to country where disease is common
  • Part of a population at risk for outbreak
Pre-teens and teens at increased risk
  • With complement component deficiency
  • Taking complement inhibitor
  • Damaged or removed spleen
  • Part of a population at risk for outbreak
Adults at increased risk
  • With complement component deficiency
  • Taking complement inhibitor
  • Damaged or removed spleen
  • Have HIV
  • Routinely exposed to Neisseria meningitidis
  • Traveling to country where disease is common
  • Part of a population at risk for outbreak
  • First-year college students in dorms
  • Military recruits

Schedule information:

  • First dose of MenACWY at 11-12 years old
  • MenACWY booster at 16
  • MenB recommended at 16-23

Meningococcal disease cases are at a historic low.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention



Safety & side effects:

Just as with any medication, there are potential side effects to vaccines. Talk to your health care provider about specific side effects associated with this vaccine and learn more about vaccine safety and common side effects.

Pregnancy considerations:

Pregnant women at increased risk for contracting the disease may receive the vaccine but should speak with their health care provider first.



Find a Clinic

There are thousands of health care providers participating in Florida SHOTS and Vaccines for Children programs across the state.



About Meningococcal Disease:

Meningococcal disease is a bacterial infection caused by the meningococcus bacteria. It can refer to a number of illnesses, including meningitis, which affects the brain or spinal cord, as well as infections of the blood. These diseases are rare but serious and can result in death.



Transmission:

Approximately 10 percent of the population are carriers of the meningococcus bacteria. The bacteria resides in the back of the throat and is spread to others via the saliva through close contact such as coughing or kissing. People who live in the same household such as family members or roommates are most susceptible. It is uncommon for people to contract the disease simply by breathing the same air as an infected person.

Out of 100 people with meningococcal disease, 10 to 15 die.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention



Symptoms:

Meningococcal meningitis occurs when the meningococcus bacteria infects the lining of the brain or spinal cord, causing swelling. Symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Stiff neck
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Light sensitivity
  • Confusion

Septicemia occurs when the meningococcus bacteria infect the bloodstream, which damages the walls of blood vessels and causes internal bleeding. Symptoms include:

  • Fever and chills
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Severe aches and pains
  • Rapid breathing
  • Diarrhea
  • Dark purple rash

Additional 10 to 20 suffer disabilities (hearing loss, brain damage, kidney damage, loss of limb, nervous system problems, severe scars from skin graft).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention